The Delegation that Never Sleeps

With New York being the hustling city that it is, our delegation jumped right into a meeting on our first day here with Professor Glenn Denning at the Ivy League Columbia University. Glenn was an encyclopaedia of knowledge regarding sustainable development. In particular, he discussed how the Sustainable Development Goals were an upgrade from the Millennium Development Goals which were too top down; failed to address inequality or environmental issues, and did not involve a lot of inclusive development. A quick tour of the campus followed and our firsthand experience tells us the university would be one of the top results were we to google “university aesthetic tumblr.”

Columbia in all its glory

Afterwards, our visit to the New Zealand Permanent Mission to the United Nations was very exciting, especially as many of us would consider our career goals to be based here. We were met by three members of the Permanent Mission: Deputy Permanent Representative Phillip Taula, Counsellor Renée Yap and 2nd Secretary Kate Neilson. With New Zealand’s term on the Security Council having just come to an end, it was inevitable that there would be considerable discussion of our achievements. The representatives emphasised our efforts in pushing for the interests of Small Island Developing States (SIDS), Middle Eastern peace and a more functional Security Council. The delegation also had the opportunity to speak to Simon Hillier, a recent graduate of Victoria University to learn about the internship programme at the Permanent Mission.

The delegation then made its way to Times Square where we were ordered a few cheeky medium-rares at Applebee’s. To top the night off, we ended with seeing child prodigies in action in the Broadway performance of Andrew Lloyd-Webber’s School of Rock.

Doesn’t get much more touristy than a Times Square jumping photo

Our second day begun with a visit to the 9/11 Memorial and Museum. The two memorial pools were an unforgettable monument, especially in the gently snowing conditions. The museum was equally impressive as it presented a multitude of voices of those involved in the attack and did so with impressive poignancy.

A poignant moment at the 9/11 Memorial

After some free time, the delegation gathered back at our wonderful hostel, Hostelling International New York, where we competed against each other in The Global Development Tour Masterchef Challenge themed around ‘New York’. Julia and I were on mains so we created the first thing that came to mind – nachos shaped in the head of the State of Liberty, of course. Our combination of blue corn chips, the smallest pinch of mince amongst a crowd of pinto beans and yummy guac deservedly won 1st place; a perfect end to our first few days in New York before Youth Assembly!

–  Matthew Handford and Teresa Lee

The Global Development Tour takes young New Zealanders to see cities leading the charge on the Sustainable Development Goals. The trip culminates in attending the Youth Assembly at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, a conference that aims to transform vision into action – empowering young people to apply all they know into meaningful change in their communities. Read more..

Geneva, AKA Career Goals City

Applications for the Global Development Tour 2018 Director and Assistant Director roles are now open: find out more!

After the previous day’s tour of the UN Headquarters, we were ready to get back to the UN and hear about what actually goes on there in finer detail. We headed back through security and into a grand meeting room, complete with chairs cosy enough to rival la-z-boys. Reaching peak comfort levels, we settled in for the morning; notepads and pens at the ready in anticipation of the UN Information Programme.

The most impressive roof in the world at the UNHQ

First up we listened to Adam Rogers from the UNDP. With an impressive career in UN work for over 20 years, it was a privilege to hear his insights on the Sustainable Development Goals. Rogers mentioned that the SDGs were a good focus for the UN, giving countries clear goals on what they needed to achieve. We then heard from Tarik Jasarevic from the World Health Organisation. Tarik told us that a current threat to world health is the emergence of lifestyle diseases, such as diabetes. This reaffirmed what we suspected about the SDGs – the goals apply to not only developing nations, but first world countries too.

The classic UNHQ shot

It wasn’t until 1pm when the group encountered the pièce de résistance of the Geneva Office – the UN Cafeteria. From the tray tables stamped with the UN logo, to the fully stocked candy bar, the group was in paradise. It has also been reported that a rare peace treaty was struck up between Mitch and David on the rights to stashing the group’s chocolate for later consumption.

We then had the opportunity to visit the Red Cross Museum nearby. With the assistance of a technologically-advanced audio guide, we split off to explore the three main exhibitions of the museum – Defending Human Dignity, Restoring Family Links and Reducing Natural Risks. A highlight for many was the large interactive touch screen table where we played Hurricane, a game in which one assumes the role of the Red Cross to help a virtual island get through a natural disaster. This required co-operation, communication and concluded with cheering when we topped the high score. Perhaps we have some budding future Red Cross volunteers among us, who can say?

Exploring the Red Cross Museum

Our next day in Geneva was a free day and we certainly made the most of it. Some ventured out into the -3 degree chill to capture the frozen beauty of Lake Geneva on their cameras. Others took advantage of the indoor (and considerably warmer) Geneva shopping scene. This caused some bags to be slightly heavier than before, but without the worries of inflight baggage weight allowances, we could breathe easy. That’s right, we were off to Paris on not a plane, but a train! It was time to say au revoir to the Swiss Franc and re-bonjour to the Euro.
After a smooth ride on the train tracks en route to Paris – we arrived late at night in the city. With a promising view of the sparkling Eiffel Tower out some of the hostel windows, we were excited to see what Paris had in store for us the next day.

– Julia Gunn

The Global Development Tour takes young New Zealanders to see cities leading the charge on the Sustainable Development Goals. The trip culminates in attending the Youth Assembly at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, a conference that aims to transform vision into action – empowering young people to apply all they know into meaningful change in their communities. Read more…

Beautiful Brussels Cont.

Applications for the Global Development Tour 2018 Director and Assistant Director roles are now open: find out more!

After a hectic first day in Brussels, the delegation walked through the crisp morning air to our only meeting of the day with Paal Frisvold. Paal has been involved a diverse range of careers, including working for the environmental activist group Bellona, the OECD and the European Free Trade Agency, and is currently involved in running the PR firm Geelmuyden Kiese. After requesting that we all introduce ourselves, Paal began the meeting by engaging in open discussion with the delegation about the recent election and inauguration of United States President Donald J. Trump, which proved very contentious as he forced us to think outside the box and ask ourselves what positives, if any, can be seen in Trump’s campaign and his policy aims.

Paal Frisvold

Paal then lead the discussion as to why Donald Trump was electable – what had created the conditions where he could capture the hopes and dreams of a nation? To answer this question, Paal took us back to the Bretton Woods conference of 1944, which saw the establishment of international financial bodies such as the GATT, the IMF and the World Bank, as well as the Marshall Plan. In his view, the establishment of these organisations and the subsequent liberalisation of economies worldwide (especially in regards to trade) led to the phenomenon of globalisation. The unequal distribution of the benefits of globalisation, best seen by the decline of manufacturing industries in the Western world as production moves to less developed countries whose labour laws are not as restrictive, was highlighted by Paal as a key cause of the Trump phenomenon.

Following this, we discussed how tech giants Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon (“GAFA”) had brought about an era of targeted advertising and how the nature of Facebook and other forms of social media meant that its users would inherently be immersed in their own bubble of news, only reading viewpoints that aligned with their own. This problem of people being immersed in bubbles was discussed further as Paal talked about the weakening of the media, before he wrapped up by discussing the merits and pitfalls of the EU, and how Brexit could in fact lead to a closer, more united Europe in a best case scenario.

After our meeting with Paal had been brought to a close, the delegation enjoyed a free afternoon, followed by a free day. Delegates and directors alike could be seen throughout Brussels shopping and sightseeing. Many delegates delighted in exploring the Centre Belge de la Bande Dessinée: Brussels’ own comic book museum, which celebrated local comic art such as Hergé’s Tintin. Other notable sights included the Magritte Museum, the Grand Place (the city square surrounded by intricately detailed guildhalls) and the Manneken Pis. Brussels was an amazing city, and myself and the delegates really enjoyed the experience of exploring it and learning about the Sustainable Development Goals at the same time.

Brussels: the only city where urination could be a national monument

– Michael Daya-Winterbottom

The Global Development Tour takes young New Zealanders to see cities leading the charge on the Sustainable Development Goals. The trip culminates in attending the Youth Assembly at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, a conference that aims to transform vision into action – empowering young people to apply all they know into meaningful change in their communities. Read more…

Brussels: the Centre of Europe

Applications for the Global Development Tour 2018 Director and Assistant Director roles are now open: find out more!

After a late flight in from Copenhagen the previous night, the delegation was excited to see what Brussels had to offer. After a short night’s sleep, our first stop was the EU Parliament where we were given a crash course in the inner workings of the Union. First, there was an informative lecture focused on explaining the processes needed to pass a bill through “Brussels” (the informal name given to the Parliament by Europeans). It was particularly interesting learning about the voting practices of the the three differing sectors and how they work independently to pass resolutions. Following this, we were able to view the EU Parliament Conference Room in which many of the most pivotal pieces of European legislature have been debated upon in previous years.

The powerhouse of European politics itself

After a tasty lunch of baguettes and biscuits in the brisk winter morning, we made our way to the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) liaison office in Brussels, where we had a meeting with Dagmur Schumacher. The main objective of this office is to work with the EU to make recommendations and implement policy in regards to women in Europe. It was inspiring to see the large amount of progress they have made over the past few years, especially with regards to the change in the way that women’s rights are perceived. A highlight of the meeting was hearing the work that UN Women have started to do in university campuses among Europe, headlined by the #heforshe campaign, and presented to the public by one of UN Women’s Goodwill Ambassadors, Emma Watson. UN Women’s work has been heavily influenced by the implementation of the SDGs, and their current operating framework is underpinned by the 17 goals. The largest take away from this most enjoyable meeting was the tagline: “50/50 by 2030”, which appeared to resonate strongly with the delegation.

UN Women

We then made the short trek to the International Crisis Group (ICG) headquarters. When we arrived, we were greeted not only by the wonderful hospitality of the ICG but also an incredible view from the 17th floor. We could see the entire cityscape, which was truly fantastic! From the Atomium sculpture, to the golden dome of the Palais du Justice, it was the perfect setting to the fascinating meeting that would follow. We were hosted by Amelia Branczik, the manager of the Brussels-based research unit. She shared with us the amazing work that the Group does, primarily in analysing conflicts worldwide to then advise Governments and NGOs on related policy. The Group release hundreds of reports annually covering 45 conflicts with almost entirely primary evidence gathered by correspondents all over the globe. It was a very enlightening meeting as we learnt of new and dynamic diplomatic tools used to diffuse conflicts.

International Crisis Group

Following this, the delegation made our way through the charming city of Brussels (having a singalong to ‘Don’t Stop Believing’ on the UE Boom en route) to our dinner venue: Chez Leon. There, the group was treated to some local Belgian cuisine and soaked up the most of the quintessential European setting.

Strolling through Brussels

– Ishan Kokulan, Romaine Crawford and Rafael Clarke

The Global Development Tour takes young New Zealanders to see cities leading the charge on the Sustainable Development Goals. The trip culminates in attending the Youth Assembly at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, a conference that aims to transform vision into action – empowering young people to apply all they know into meaningful change in their communities. Read more…

Ciao Copenhagen, Brussels-bound

Applications for the Global Development Tour 2018 Director and Assistant Director roles are now open: find out more!

After finishing up with the final ordeals of packing and storing luggage, the delegation headed off to its last two meetings in Copenhagen. The air was crisp and cold, but the delegation excited and energetic.

Our first meeting was with a young urban-based design studio: arki_lab

Our first meeting was with a young urban-based design studio: arki_lab. Rasmus Frisk, the co-founder and CEO, addressed us with a presentation that was both inspiring and thought-provoking. He addressed the importance of sustainable cities being designed with collaboration between the public and private sector, whereby the needs of both citizens and corporations are met. The visit not only enabled us to gain a social perspective on urban sustainability but also empowered us as young people to develop innovative ideas for free urban spaces. Outside of designing, arki_lab has held training sessions for the public, corporations and youth to be socially aware of how they can contribute to a sustainable, futuristic city. One key idea arki_lab presented that I found particularly interesting was the advantage of re-developing pre-existing infrastructure instead of rebuilding it. We had seen examples of this elsewhere in Copenhagen by the UN City, with the re-purposing of concrete silos as commercial spaces. This method decreases a project’s development time and helps best capitalise upon existing resources. Mr Frisk also gave us access to the green roof of the office building which had an amazing 360 view of the Copenhagen skyline with its occasional church spires.

Couldn’t miss our Titanic photo op on the green roof
The skyline’s quite different to anything we have at home

Following our intriguing meeting at arki_lab, we set off to find some smørrebrød for lunch. These Danish open sandwiches consisted of vegetable and meat toppings called “pålæg” on top of a single piece of dense brown, multigrain bread. The smørrebrød were both interesting and delicious and gave us energy to actively participate in the afternoon ahead.
This afternoon begun on a sadder note, with the departure of our dearest Dushanka. Due to a knee injury sustained in London, she had to leave us in Copenhagen. We were all incredibly sad to see her go and the farewell was a tearful one. She brought so much joy, laughter, and banter on the trip, and we will miss her greatly. While we may have envied her first-class flight home, we wished her all the best in the long journey ahead.

A sad farewell to our dear Dushanka

Venturing to the University of Copenhagen, we had the pleasure of speaking to Søren Bøye Olsen, the head of the Master’s Degree programme in Environmental Economics. This was a refreshing delve into a topic we had not yet covered in depth our meetings up until now. The key principle of Environmental Economics is the valuation of our surroundings so that we may take them into consideration when deciding new policies to implement, such as green taxes, tariffs, quotas, and regulations.

Working with the Danish government and other organisations, the University of Copenhagen has advised on many projects. Olsen was able to not only explain to us the true importance of such work but he provided many rich examples. He spoke to us about evaluating farmland for reforestation and was able to demonstrate the economic advantages of each proposal through the valuation of the environment. However, his personal passion is the concept of using insects as a prospective future food source, with their superior nutritional and sustainable properties compared to more traditional sources. While we were all fascinated to hear about fried termites and cricket flour bread, it may be a while yet before insect products start hitting the shelves. Olsen’s perspective opened many of our eyes to the kind of factors and information that policy makers must take into consideration when making decisions.

With our final meeting of Copenhagen over, we finished our Danish experience with a wonderful vegetarian buffet dinner at Riz Raz. Lasagna to die for and the best hummus this side of the equator was an excellent way to end our time here in Copenhagen. Dropping back to the hostel for only a farewell and bag pickup, we made our way to the airport with plenty of time to spare. The almost deserted flight with Ryan Air meant that everyone was able to get their own row for a pleasant snooze as we flew over the picturesque Danish, German, and Belgian countryside. Despite a bit of shuttle drama in the -3°C cold, we arrived at our hostel safe and sound and very excited for the days ahead in the wondrous city of Brussels.

– Young Wu and Charlotte Hollywood

The Global Development Tour takes young New Zealanders to see cities leading the charge on the Sustainable Development Goals. The trip culminates in attending the Youth Assembly at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, a conference that aims to transform vision into action – empowering young people to apply all they know into meaningful change in their communities. Read more…

Copenhagen: The Green City

“Good Morning Copenhagen, it is -3°C with clear blue skies so go put on some layers and prepare for the action packed day ahead” – or maybe just one more snooze in our cosy beds.

By 9:40 am we were off to our first meeting of the day: State of Green. Upon arrival, the green motif was made immediately apparent from the rows of potted greenery along the entrance to their building. We were escorted up a flight of green stairs into a very dynamic meeting environment. Square blocks for seats, digital walls and the smell of fair trade coffee added to the allure of the organisation. After making drinks and taking seats, we were introduced to Charlotte Gjedde, a representative of House of Green who provided us with an insight into the Danish sustainability mindset. We learned about the spectacular transition from an oil reliant nation to a country that strives to be sustainable. Wind power, the promotion of electric cars and the use of incinerators to reduce waste entering landfills are just a few of the ways Denmark fosters a circular economy.

Charlotte Gjedde of the House of Green gives an insight on the Danish sustainability mindset
Interactive charts compared different countries sustainable efforts across a variety of metrics.

Our next stop for the day was the City of Copenhagen which is the name for the Copenhagen City Council. Considering Copenhagen is known as the city of bicycles, we were curious to find out how the council had managed such a transition from cars so quickly.

“We used the carrot instead of the stick”

We discovered that the city council achieved this transition through a raft of changes designed to make it the preferred option of travel. For example, in Copenhagen there are private biking lanes around the city, bike only short-cuts, priority maintenance (especially with snow clearance), and bikes start 6 seconds sooner than cars at traffic lights.

Another interesting initiative was Copenhagen’s community tree program. Upon request, residents have trees planted on the sidewalk by their homes in exchange for three years of consistent maintenance. This means that residents get to have a greener looking city that could not be achieved without the maintenance provided by locals.

The City of Copenhagen has been working hard to make bikes the most popular form of transport

After this meeting we had free time where most of us went to explore the town of Cristianhavn. It was a very melancholic region and it was home to many nomads, however, the historic value of the experience made it worth exploring, even though many found the conditions unsettling.

Overall, our day was a thoroughly enjoyable experience which ended with great burgers and chips before we headed off to sleep for much needed rest, eager to see what our final day in Copenhagen had in store.

Cristianhavn – a very melancholic region
Just enough time for another addition to Tei’s snap story

– Tei Driver and Sam Porta

The Global Development Tour takes young New Zealanders to see cities leading the charge on the Sustainable Development Goals. The trip culminates in attending the Youth Assembly at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, a conference that aims to transform vision into action – empowering young people to apply all they know into meaningful change in their communities. Read more…

Out and About in Copenhagen

After a late night arrival, the delegation awoke to -2°C weather on Tuesday morning –  a brutal yet strangely energising introduction to our first day in Copenhagen. After sleeping off the intensity of yesterday, we were ready to begin the second leg of our tour. New city, new us.

We set off around 10am for our walking tour of the city. We met Salka, our tour guide from Sandeman’s and we began our tour. We were lead through stunning streets and past glistening canals. Along the way Salka educated us on the past, present and future of Copenhagen and Denmark. The highlights of the tour included the colourful houses of Nyhavn, seeing the changing of the guard outside the palace, and the many Instagram opportunities.

Nyhavn

After the tour came to an end, we jumped on the metro, and headed off to our second adventure of the day: UN City. Here, we were overwhelmed with spiral staircases, beautiful artwork, and huge flags of each of the Sustainable Development Goals. We were definitely in the right place. We were introduced to Lisa and Paula – interns for the World Food Programme (WFP). They took us through an amazing and informative presentation about exactly what it is that the WFP does, and how their work applies to the SDGs. We learnt that their three main focuses are: providing aid when emergencies strike; helping rebuild the communities after disasters ; and then providing long-term support to ensure the country is safe, happy and healthy for the future. The WFP helps over 80 million individuals per year, in around 82 countries. The meeting ignited a fire in myself (and I believe all of the delegates) to want to help support the WFP, and strengthen the bond between New Zealand and the organisation when we return home.

Another intern, Emma, then took us for a tour around UN City. We learnt how sustainable and environmentally-friendly the building is, who the different organisations are that occupy the facility, and their plans for future expansion. It is safe to say that after all the inspiring knowledge we received today, we will all be fighting to work at the UN City one day.

‘The Broken Piano’ at UN City

Although today was the coldest we have experienced so far, it wasn’t able to dampen our spirits. Finishing off with a delegation dinner at a Turkish buffet, the day as a whole was the perfect mix of the city’s history (thanks to the walking tour) and the city’s future (thanks to UN City). We will now absorb the information today’s adventures so kindly gifted us, rest, and get ready for another day in the beautiful city of Copenhagen tomorrow.

  • Madeleine Adams

The Global Development Tour takes young New Zealanders to see cities leading the charge on the Sustainable Development Goals. The trip culminates in attending the Youth Assembly at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, a conference that aims to transform vision into action – empowering young people to apply all they know into meaningful change in their communities. Read more…

Lovin’ London, Copenhagen Callin’

After a whirlwind first full day of the Tour, we welcomed a free weekend spent exploring the many facets and boroughs of the amazing London. Over the two days, the sights covered included: Tower Bridge, the Tower of London, Buckingham Palace, the Victoria & Albert, Tate Modern, the Natural History museum, Regent and Oxford Streets (aka: a shopper’s paradise), Harrod’s, the sets of Sherlock, a West End play and for some even a (supposed) chance encounter with Jamie Oliver in Covent Garden…

Spot the tourists

In preparation for an exciting final day in London, Monday morning started with a 5am wake up for the delegation in the calm suburb of Hither Green. We finished packing, had breakfast and went through the day’s briefing, before heading off to the train station with all our luggage. A maintenance issue for the train system meant that the trains we were trying to catch were the first of the day. This made for a very cramped ride into the city (in other words, a proper representation of London public transport).

Somehow we managed to arrive at the UN Global Compact right on time. Our  meeting commenced with Steve Kenzie – one of the staff members at London’s local network for the UN organ. We were hosted in an art gallery featuring 60s style Bond art, which gave a very cool vibe

At the meeting, we were introduced to all the work that the UN Global Compact does, being exposed to the facets under the branch of business sustainability. The UN Global Compact have helped to create resources including the SDG Compass and SDG Navigator. This allows companies to align their strategies with the SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals). We were about to play an SDG board game that UN Global Compact had prepared for us, but the presentation had left us with tonnes of questions. Personally, I left the meeting with a greater understanding about how sustainability in businesses can be realistically achieved.

“I left the meeting with a greater understanding about how sustainability in businesses can be realistically achieved”

The lunch break provided us with another chance to savour the pinnacle of English cuisine: the mighty Tesco three pound meal deal. This was perhaps the most picturesque snack spot yet. We consumed our cheesy tomato pastas and San Pellegrino in the middle of Trafalgar Square. The Square provided a multitude of ideal Instagram snaps; revelations on the secrets of levitating Yodas (thanks Maddie), and some mightily aggressive pigeons.

All this conquered, we headed around the corner to New Zealand House where we were greeted by the comforting sound of some classic Kiwi slang –  we had indeed found our home in central London. Daniel Taylor of New Zealand Trade and Enterprise gave a short talk on the function of New Zealand’s trading scheme. He also gave strategic overview of our NZ’s strengths and pitfalls in various international markets. His specific focus was the UK – the area over which he has jurisdiction. An in-depth Q&A session followed and Daniel discussed everything from the potential impacts of Brexit on New Zealand trade, to the expansion and diversification of our exports.

The delegation was then fortunate enough to meet with 3 representatives from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, who discussed extensively their roles in both the UK and on a wider international scale. We notably learned that New Zealand has a significant amount of political influence globally, with our recent term on the UN Security Council reinforcing this. Specifically, their explanation of our role at the forefront of both the Commonwealth and Pacific region was important as we look forward to the influences New Zealand can have upon our implementation of the SDGs.

The meeting ended with a trip to the penthouse including an extensive balcony. Even the perfectionist ‘Grammers were satisfied with an incredible, 360 view of central London. Our brains and camera rolls full, we thanked our hosts and departed for Luton Airport – luggage in tow.

A view from above

Exhausted and excited, we left London eagerly awaiting our time in Copenhagen, and the continuation of what is shaping up to be a truly life changing tour.

– Antoine Ellis and Casey Brown

The Global Development Tour takes young New Zealanders to see cities leading the charge on the Sustainable Development Goals. The trip culminates in attending the Youth Assembly at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, a conference that aims to transform vision into action – empowering young people to apply all they know into meaningful change in their communities. Read more…

London: A Night at the Museum and the Circular Economy

First experience of London public transport!

Whilst Friday the 13th may be renowned as an unlucky day for most, this was not the case for the Global Development Tour delegation!

The Tour officially kicked off with the opportunity to visit the head of investment at the London Waste and Recycling Board (LWARB): Stuart Ferguson. Despite our exhaustion from over 30 hours of flying, we were really able to engage in conversation and questions about LWARB, whose primary role is to provide a strategic approach to effective waste management in London. In general, they do this through bringing together a wide variety of waste stakeholders and partners, and ensure success of their primary goals through 3 main programme areas, one of which being the ‘Circular Economy’ project. Through successful execution of a circular economy, resources are used to maximum efficiency, and therefore kept in use for as long as possible; unlike the conventional ‘linear economy’ in which we simply make, use and dispose of resources.

“It was amazing to see how circular economies were already being used by major organisations and multinationals around the world.”

During our visit, we were able to see just how much LWARB’s initiatives are aligned with the framework of the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The circular economy project is the key to the government’s primary plan for growth – where inclusive and sustainable economic growth and employment (goal 8), a resilient infrastructure (goal 9), and sustainable consumption and production patterns (goal 12) are prioritised goals. It was amazing to see how circular economies were already being used by major organisations and multinationals around the world. The visit was extremely rewarding! The delegation now has an expanded perspective and knowledge bank in which is going to become extremely useful when we get to Youth Assembly.

London Waste and Recycling Board

Next on the agenda was some free time in groups exploring the sprawling metropolis that is London, visiting sites such as St Paul’s, Big Ben, Downing Street and Westminster Abbey – providing an opportunity to stretch our legs and get many a photo op along the way (of course!)

The delegation regrouped for our second meeting of the trip at the Institute of Business Ethics (IBE), which truly embodies what it means to be a citizen aware of the future. Philippa Foster Back – the Director – started her presentation with key information about ethical business practices and what it means to be a business looking after your people and your future. Full of insightful information and knowledge , Philippa was very clearly passionate about the job she did. Having spent time in New Zealand, Philippa made an effort to ensure that kiwi businesses were highlighted and context was provided where possible.

The team were particularly engaged when Philippa provided a case study to us, entitled Loyalty Challenged, which presented an ethical dilemma for the delegation to consider. Many were divided on the subject; some argued that they would stand by their friends in times of need, while others felt that corporate loyalty in this case took precedence.

Philippa Foster Back at Institute of Business Ethics

We left more informed and with an incredible amount of respect for the IBE and Philippa.

The night was spent exploring the British Museum and the glorious site that is London in the dark. The British Museum is an incredibly beautiful, peaceful place to spend some time late at night. Home to glorious artefacts, mementos and key pieces of world history, the British Museum was a welcome throwback for many to high school Classics classes and crazy teachers. Particular favourites for the delegation included the Roman and Greek exhibitions.

Revisiting home in the Pasifika department of British Museum

Our first day in London has been hectic but fun, and we cannot wait to see what the rest of our time in this city has in store!

– Ayush Sharma & Hannah Long

The Global Development Tour takes young New Zealanders to see cities leading the charge on the Sustainable Development Goals. The trip culminates in attending the Youth Assembly at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, a conference that aims to transform vision into action – empowering young people to apply all they know into meaningful change in their communities. Read more…

We’re off! | Global Development Tour

Farewell from Auckland Airport!

Hello from Auckland Airport! Well, after 8 months of planning, studying and general anticipation, we’re finally all together and the Global Development Tour 2017 is ready to depart! It is going to be a hectic 4 weeks of meetings with diplomats, NGOs and UN agencies all in preparation for our attendance at the Winter Youth Assembly at the UNHQ in New York next month!

For anyone keen to follow the progress of the Tour, check back here every few days for detailed updates of our progress through London, Copenhagen, Brussels, Geneva, Paris and, of course, New York. You can also follow the UN Youth Twitter @unyouthnz and Snapchat (unyouthnz) for real-time pictures and learnings from our meetings, or follow our hashtag #devtour17 on Instagram and Twitter!

You’ll next be hearing from us in the considerably colder London – we’ll catch you there!

  • Mitchell Fraser, Associate Director